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Proper Winter Preparation Is Key To A Healthy Lawn

You’re sitting outside and enjoying the beautiful weather. The sun is shining and the birds are chirping. Summer is; however, coming to an end and fall is in the air. That means that it’s time to get ready to begin preparing your lawn for the impending winter. Many people begin caring for their lawns in the early spring but the real key for a magnificent, lush lawn in the spring lies in proper winter preparation.

moWe are still very much in the throes of summer and next year’s lawn is most likely the furthest thing from your mind. The truth is that the key to the success of your next year’s lawn is how you prepare it for the cold winter months. To insure that your lawn is as green and lush as can be, preparations should begin early in the fall.

For those lucky enough to live in one of the southern states, such as Florida, where the weather is agreeable all year round, lawn care is a year-round affair. For those living in the northern states and Canada, where the temperatures dip below freezing and grasses go dormant during the winter, lawns require maintenance for three seasons: spring, summer and fall (winter preparation).

For those of us that have to deal with winter, it’s almost time to start thinking about getting our lawns ready. Winter preparation is critical but doesn’t require a tremendous effort. In order to bring your lawn to a whole new level next year, make sure that you take the following steps this fall: – See more at: http://www.landscapingtoronto.ca/proper-winter-preparation-is-key-to-a-healthy-lawn#sthash.dYWwo9aI.dpuf

Aerate The Soil

Lawns and soil take a real thumping during the summer months, especially if you have children. In order for grass, or any plant for that matter, to grow healthily, roots require a certain amount of air. Every time that you walk on your lawn or mow it, you are essentially compacting the soil. When aerating the soil, you are pulling plugs of soil. This allows air to get to the roots which means that your lawn will get the nutrients it needs to prosper.

Rake Regularly

The colors that leaves turn in the fall are simply magical; then the leaves fall and make a mess on your lawn. If left, the leaves will eventually form a layer of decomposing vegetative mass above the soil. Plants require light, water and nutrients in order to survive. A layer of vegetative junk will prevent your lawn from receiving all three. Raking your lawn during the fall will prevent a build-up of vegetative mass.

Sow Winter Grass Seeds

Over the course of years, a homeowner will generally sow a variety of different grass seeds. Different grasses will tolerate different levels of cold and, as a result, some grasses might go dormant during the winter and some might hang in there throughout the winter. If your lawn looks pretty good during the winter but has a couple of yellow patches then you might want to consider sowing seeds of annual winter grasses such as winter rye. It is recommended that you plant winter rye during the beginning of the fall.

Add Fertilizer

Your lawn drew nutrients non-stop from the soil all summer long and fall is the time to start giving back. Applying one healthy helping of fertilizer in the early fall and one in late fall (just before the soil freezes) will encourage the development of a healthy root system and insure that your lawn is best prepared weathering the cold. Lawns require more phosphorous and potassium during the winter, inquire at your local garden store for what fertilizer best suited for your area.

Water Occasionally

It is important to water your lawn occasionally in the fall, especially if there isn’t a great deal of rain. If you planted annual winter grass then make sure to water with greater frequency.

Apply Herbicide If Necessary

If you have a problem with weeds then fall is the proper time to go on the attack.

If you spend all spring and summer investing time and money on your lawn but just don’t seem to get the results you are looking for then the problem very well might be that you aren’t properly preparing your lawn in the fall for the winter. With a minimum of effort this fall, you will find yourself the envy of your neighbors next spring.